Was ist Flattr?
Untrans.eu

Maverick

Somebody who calls himself the Maverick Philosopher wrote this in his blog on the subject of untranslatability (I quote):
„When I hear it said that some text is untranslatable, my stock response is that in that case the text is not worth translating.  If it cannot be translated out of Sanskrit or Turkish or German, then what universal human interest could it have?
The truth is one, universal, and absolute.  If you have something to say that makes a claim to being true, then it better be translatable. Otherwise it has no claim on our attention.“
I think this is rather ironic, since the term maverick itself is simply not translatable into Spanish or German. In German the term is a little known, so some people use the term as if it was a loanword and thus already German and assume others will understand it. When a German speaking representative says the word during a meeting with a Central-American politician the interpreter might experience some difficulties. According to my Merriam-Webster, the word refers to someone who is “an independent individual who does not go along with a group or party”, it goes back to the US-American Samuel A. Maverick, an American pioneer who did not brand his cattle, was first used in 1867 and has several synonyms, none of which mean exactly the same: bohemian, counterculturist, deviant (OMG!), enfant terrible (no, French doesn’t nail it either), iconoclast, nonconformist… I am sorry, but the listed synonyms are not helpful when trying to find a translation. The Linguee-Website does not give a solution either, it even gives as an example “the maverick president” which the suggested translation “el presidente disidente”. Sorry, but I don’t think the word “dissident” fits with the post of “president”, at least not as long as he holds office. The dissidents are by definition the ones who fight the established order, not the president who holds the post that represents this order. How is the Central-American politician expected to make heads or tails of such a translation? Other suggestions include inconformista and rebelde. The problem remains, the proposed solutions are not correct. This is getting hard to crack… Then the term “freewheeling” came to my mind, it made me think of the freewheelin’ Bob Dylan and of Freewheelin’ Franklin, from the comic series The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers, by Gilbert Sheldon. This word was coined in 1931 (always according to Merriam-Webster) and means “a. heedless of social norms and niceties […] c. not bound by formal rules, procedures, or guidelines”. Sounds good to me, but I can’t translate this term either. The only synonym suggested reads “footloose” and that doesn’t help me either. I feel I am reaching the limit of my wits. So sorry, my dear Maverick Philosopher! It seems you have no claim to our attention! Which is a pity, as you do write interesting things. And the Central-American politician? I am afraid he did not understand what the German speaker wanted to say, but he will probably have forgotten the conversation by now. Only the minutes of the meeting rest, probably buried in some deep archive, gathering dust, unread (I hope). A humbled interpreter rests as well. And this entry is the result.

Kommentare

 
Am 16.03.2014 um 07:59 von dr1fter
how about translating 'maverick' to the German 'Querkopf' or 'Eigenbrötler'?
antworten
untrans.eu
Am 16.03.2014 um 08:59 von Jordi
There is something of both in /maverick/, but also of eigenwillig, unkonventionell, Querdenker/in, unorthodox, Außenseiter/in, Rebell/in, Nonkonformist/in and then some. One word to fit them all in! Is that too much to ask for? I am afraid, in German and Spanish, it is. Except if you translate /maverick/ with /maverick/. You can do that in German, I guess. But not into Spanish, I am afraid.
antworten
 
Am 16.03.2014 um 09:01 von Martin
Es ist lustig für mich, ich habe hier und dort Artikel gelesen die mir durch die Bank weg gefallen haben. ^^
Also beim Stöbern durch diesen Blog habe ich travioso mit Querkopf übersetzt für der Erwachsen Menschen, aber travioso mit Schelm übersetzt, wenn man über ein Kind spricht.
Jetzt wage ich mich vor mit einem Umkehrschluß.
Der Maverick, der weder alliiert noch in oppsition steht sei ein travioso.
antworten
untrans.eu
Am 17.03.2014 um 10:50 von Jordi
Danke für Deine freundlichen Kommentare, Martin! Mir gefällt Deine Einstellung, auch wenn einige Deiner Schlussfolgerungen etwas gewagt sind. Hauptsache, es macht Spaß. Uns beiden :-)
antworten
 
Am 25.03.2014 um 05:38 von Bernd
Eine mögliche deutsche Übersetzung könnte "Freigeist" sein.
antworten
untrans.eu
Am 25.03.2014 um 06:44 von Jordi
Ja, Bernd, manchmal stimmt das wohl. Aber eben nicht immer, maverick kann viel mehr und auch viel weniger als Freigeist bedeuten. Ich verorte einen Freigeist vor allen im Bereich der Gedanken und der Ideen, einen maverick sehe ich eher im Bereich der Taten und der Einstellung zu den anderen, insbesondere der Autorität und der Konventionen. Aber das ist subjektiv. Mangels eines besseren Vorschlags kann man es mit Freigeist sicher versuchen. Vielen Dank für Deinen Beitrag!
antworten
 
Am 25.03.2014 um 06:51 von André (Alemol)
Ich habe „Allein-/Einzelgänger“ als mögliche deutsche Übersetzungen gefunden, und finde sie eigentlich recht passend. Was meint ihr dazu? Im Spanischen wäre das dann vielleicht ein „lobo solitario“?
antworten
untrans.eu
Am 25.03.2014 um 08:10 von Jordi
Lobo solitario? Ein Steppenwolf, wie bei Hesse? Aber ein maverick ist kein Einzelgänger, André, er kann durchaus ein Partylöwe sein, oder ein Präsident, wo mir die Übersetzung ¨presidente rebelde¨ (einer der vielen Möglichkeiten, die Linguee vorschlägt) so absurd vorkam. Und falsch obendrein. Ein maverick pfeifft vielleicht auf gesellschaftliche Konventionen, er kann aber durchaus sozial sein, vielleicht sogar sympathisch. Aber ich wäre auch gespannt, was andere dazu meinen. Dafür schreibe ich diese Beiträge schliesslich. Englische Muttersprachler wären jetzt vonnöten. Help!
Ist ein maverick pejorativ? Ist ein Allein-/Einzelgänger pejorativ?
antworten
 
Am 25.03.2014 um 08:20 von André (Alemol)
Du hast recht – das passt nicht. Wie wäre es mit „Nonkonformist“? (http://www.duden.de/suchen/dudenonline/Nonkonformist) Das deckt sich ja mit der englischen Definition, ist ziemlich neutral und kann je nach Kontext entsprechend ausgelegt werden ...
antworten
untrans.eu
Am 25.03.2014 um 08:25 von Jordi
Ein maverick ist meistens sicher ein Nonkonformist, aber ob es andersherum auch stimmt? Ich glaube, ein maverick ist mehr, aber ich bin kein Muttersprachler. Wie gesagt, wir brauchen Hilfe.
antworten
 
Am 12.02.2019 um 03:05 von Maverick (sic!)
Sounds like the problem is not solved yet? Here another example that shows that the suggestions so far are inadequate: https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2019/02/walter-jones-north-carolina-obituary-freedom-fries/581569/
antworten
untrans.eu
Am 12.02.2019 um 03:13 von Jordi
Nice nick you have chosen, I like that. And you are right: the problem is by no means solved and the Spanish speakers have hardly started to contribute.
antworten

Kommentar hinzufügen